Tipple Tuesday: Paper Plane

Chuck’s note: This is a guest post from my friend Tyler Machovina. We have very similar tastes and he recommended this drink to me. The only drink-related thing we disagree on is whether the Negroni or Boulevardier is superior. 

To continue on theme of potable bitters for hot summer days I present the Paper Plane: A deliciously dry pre-dinner aperitivo for when it is too hot to contemplate eating. Have one and it will probably have cooled off a bit. Still a bit balmy? Have another, or two. Who needs dinner anyway when there is Campari to be enjoyed?

I had some trouble tracking down a solid history for this drink but it seems it was invented by Sammy J Ross of Milk & Honey and originally calls for Buffalo Trace bourbon. Well, I had already spent $50 on Amaro Nonino on this trip so I decided on the still delicious and sweet Old Grand Dad. Don’t feel bad about buying cheap bourbon! Though Chuck may disagree with the State setting standards, anything labeled as bourbon in the US is held to a very high standard so you’ll probably never find anything too terrible for mixing. Of course, it all depends on the drink—I might not use OGD for an Old Fashioned, but a shaken cocktail with strong flavors like Campari, Nonino, and lemon juice I think the Grand Dad will work just fine.

FullSizeRender

As a shaken cocktail I recommend making the Paper Plane with a boston shaker and a Hawthorne strainer as those shakers with a built in strainer just make a mess and are a pain to clean. I would also advise double straining to keep the tiny ice shards out of the final drink – this gives a cleaner presentation and a smoother mouth feel.

Add equal parts (3/4 oz for one drink) of lemon juice, Amaro Nonino, Campari, and bourbon into a shaker filled with ice and shake vigorously for about twenty seconds. Double strain into a chilled coupe glass (or small wine glass). No garnish needed.

IMG_1533

It’s possible the original recipe called for Aperol rather than Campari. The history of cocktails can be a bit… hazy. The Aperol variation is a bit sweeter and has a beautiful bright salmon color but lacks the refreshing grapefruit dryness that the Campari brings. 

Paper PlanePaper Plane

Can’t find Amaro Nonino? This recipe appears to be often misprinted with Ramazzotti rather than Nonino and apparently still yields tasty results.

Tipple Tuesday: It’s Negroni Week!

Let’s get right to business: Equal parts gin, Campari, and sweet vermouth. Make it even better with orange bitters and an orange peel. If the bitterness of the classic Negroni isn’t your thing, use Lillet Blanc instead of Campari to make a French Negroni.

June 6-12 is Negroni Week, a time to sip one of the best cocktails we can imagine and support some great charities.

Save these recipe cards to your iPhone and import them into the free Highball app.

Negroni RecipeFrench Negroni

 

The simple recipe is easy to remember, easy to make, and great to experiment with. Have some fun this week. Here are some ideas:

Negroni variations

Sip a tasty Negroni this week and donate to a good cause.

Tipple Tuesday: Orchard Boulevardier

Here is a drink for your next bonfire or fall outing.

Not only does apple cider make this drink festive, but it includes Campari (which if you are a regular reader, you know I love), spicy rye, and a good vermouth. It also scales well. You can easily make a large batch for your next party.

Credit for this recipe goes to Serious Eats. I merely scaled it for one, made it, and took photos of it.

Orchard Boulevardier

  • 3 oz Apple Cider
  • 1 1/2 oz Rye Whiskey
  • 3/4 oz Campari
  • 3/4 oz Sweet Vermouth (I prefer Carpano Antica)
  • Lemon peel for garnish

Heat all of the liquid ingredients in a small saucepan just to a simmer, then immediately remove from heat and stir. Pour into a small cocktail glass and garnish with a lemon peel. Serve with a slice of apple pie.

Save this recipe card image to your iPhone and import it into the free Highball app.

Orchard Boulevardier recipe card for Highball

Making an Orchard Boulevardier in a Turkish Coffee potApple Pie

 

Notes and variations:

  • I use a Turkish coffee pot for heating up cocktails. It is a perfect size and easy to pour from.
  • A few dashes of apple bitters or black walnut bitters would be great in this.
  • You can garnish with an orange or grapefruit peel if you don’t have a lemon.

Orchard Boulevardier

Tipple Tuesday: Negroni

In my opinion, the king of all summer drinks is the Negroni, which is said to have been born in 1919 when Count Camillo Negroni asked the bartender at Caffe Casoni to replace the club soda in an Americano with gin. The result is boozy, bitter, and wonderful.

The simple equal-parts recipe of gin, Campari, and sweet vermouth is a great base for young cocktail artisans to experiment with. Here are some ideas:

  • Add a few couple of dashes of orange bitters (my preferred recipe)
  • Try different gins
  • Swap Aperol for Campari
  • Swap Cappelletti for Campari
  • Replace gin with bourbon for a Boulevardier (this my go-to drink in the winter when I’m not drinking whiskey neat)
  • Try different sweet vermouths. Carpano Antica and Punt e Mes are particularly good.
  • Swap rum for gin and East India sherry for vermouth for an East India Negroni

Save this recipe card image to your iPhone and import it into the free Highball app.

Negroni Recipe

 

Negroni

 

Do you want a clear ice cube like this? Get the Neat Ice Kit.

Tipple Tuesday: Campari Soda

Campari SodaDuring the hot days at the end of summer, my go-to liqueur is Campari, a potable bitter aperitif made from bitter herbs, aromatic plants, and fruit. It is bright red and deliciously bitter, which is much more refreshing in the hot sun than sweet, sugary drinks. I’m sharing two Campari drinks this week and three next week.

Campari Soda is one of the simplest Campari cocktails to make. Mix 2oz of Campari with soda and ice in a highball glass, then garnish with a lemon. Since its alcohol content is only 24%, once mixed with soda, it is light and easy to drink.

Campari Soda is so popular in Italy that it is sold pre-bottled in a classic bottle designed by Italian Futurist Fortunato Depero in the 1930s.

A Bar Above recommends adding 1/2oz of Cointreau to a Campari Soda to “round out the hard bitter edges.” They call this a Campari Crush. If you make this, garnish with an orange instead of a lemon to complement the orange flavor in Cointreau.

Save these recipe card images to your iPhone and import them into the free Highball app.

Campari Soda

 

Campari Crush

 

Campari and CointreauCampari Crush