Aging Homemade Pear Brandy

Back in January my friend Zak Schusterman of Sleepy Hollow Handiwerks gave me a toasted oak stick to use for aging cocktails. He had been over for drinks the week before and he sampled my aged Negroni. Since he does a lot of woodworking, I asked if he could give me some sources for buying untreated American Oak to make more staves of my own. Being the gracious guy that he is, Zak not only found some, he even toasted it for me.

Zak’s toasting notes: Wrap the staves in foil and toast in the oven for 1.5 hrs at 400F, then .5 hrs at 450F.

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Zak posted a photo of the oak sticks after coming out of the oven.

I knew immediately what I wanted to use the oak stave for: My Dad passed along some unaged homemade pear brandy made by a friend of his. It was too harsh to drink (almost like Everclear), so it had been sitting in my cabinet for two months. This was just the stuff that aging was made for.

Traditional brandies are aged in oak casks, which serves two goals:

  1. Integrating the vanilla overtones of the oak with the fruit flavors of the brandy.
  2. Allowing the brandy to breathe and expel alcohol, which concentrates the flavors as time passes.

The toasted oak stave will do the job of number 1. Since these are toasted instead of charred, they will impart vanilla instead of smokey flavors that charred stick would into the spirit they are aged with.

To mimic number 2, I read around on home distilling forums and found that the most common way to let a spirit breathe is to put it in a glass bottle with a coffee filter over the top, so I did just that. It has been aging in my bar cabinet for the past two months.

Here are some photos of the aging process, beginning January 26 and ending March 26.

I was pleasantly surprised with the outcome! After just two months, this spirit turn into something that is almost sippable. It is still a little hot, but the flavors have really opened up. I enjoyed the couple of ounces I had. The alcohol has toned down quite a bit and the pear flavors are shining through. The oak definitely imparted some very nice vanilla and caramel notes. I even taste some honey on the end of each sip.

For now, I’d say that it is still a mixing brandy. After a few more months, it will probably be a regular sipper!

4 thoughts on “Aging Homemade Pear Brandy

  1. martha ekdahl April 20, 2017 / 7:25 pm

    Your pear brandy reminded me of St. George’s pear brandy. I recommend a visit to their distillery the next time you’re in the Bay Area, if you haven’t been already. Their spirits are great and their distillery is located on an old airfield with views of the San Francisco skyline.

    Like

    • Chuck April 21, 2017 / 1:39 pm

      St. George’s is good stuff! I’ll definitely check out the distillery next time I’m in the Bay Area. Thanks!

      Like

  2. Darrell December 28, 2017 / 8:23 pm

    Now that a few more months have passed has the brandy turned into a dipper?

    Like

    • Chuck Grimmett November 18, 2018 / 6:31 pm

      I finally tried it, a year and a half later. It did mellow out, but it isn’t a dipper. I’ll probably end up mixing it or pouring it out. Disappointing.

      Like

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